Standing on the Ocean Floor: Bay of Fundy

Back in Canada.

After spending two days crossing Maine, we were back in Canada. First stop: Saint John. In Saint John, we stayed at the campus of the University, which was quite fun to see where the students of this university stayed during the school year.

Changing tides and market time

Saint John is a town near the sea and it is easy to notice that. Especially if you go to Reversing Rapids. If the tide is low, then the Saint John River empties into the Bay of Fundy, causing a series of fast rapids and whirlpools. When the tide change, the opposite is happening: water from the Bay of Fundy flows into the Saint John River, forming rapids again. Such a cycle takes about 12.5 hours. Personally I did not think that the Reversing Rapids were that spectacular, but we were there on a cloudy day, so maybe if the weather is better the rapids might be more enjoyable.

A beautiful place in Saint John is the City Market. Lots of items are sold here, like fruits and vegetables, (handmade) art, fish and meat and drinks. The colors are wonderful and the smells are exotic. We saw some pretty items made out of glass and were very interested in those items (a dragonfly and a butterfly sculpture made out of glass). When we asked the lady how she made them (we thought she made them), she said that she bought them straight out of China. That’s a bummer… Well, at least they were beautiful.

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Saint John City Market

Bay of Fundy

After visiting Saint John and while driving to the St. Martins Sea Caves, we went inside the Fundy National Park. You need to pay a couple of bucks to enter the park, but it is quite nice. You can drive your car to all of the different stops, or you can walk an entire trail. We used a car, obviously!

There are a lot of nice view points along the coastline. You can see small falls as well as a river in the National Park. And of course lots and lots of the Bay of Fundy!

hopewell-rocks

See the sea in caves

St. Martins offers you the opportunity to walk on the ocean floor to the St. Martins Sea Caves. During high tide, it is not possible to access the sea caves, but during low tide, you can walk into the caves. Lots and lots of shells and little crabs can be found on the ‘beach’ that pops up after the water leaves.

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St. Martins Sea Caves

The inside of the caves is a little bit dark, as you can see on the picture. The further you go in, the darker it gets (of course haha).

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Inside a sea cave

Standing on the ocean floor

The Hopewell Rocks are also located near the coast of the Bay of Fundy. During low tide, you will be able to descend to the ‘ocean floor’. This means that you will be able to walk somewhere, where there is normally a large layer of water. This is a fascination idea. When we walked on the wet sand, it was easy to see that during high tide, the water levels would be meters higher.

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Hopewell Rocks

You could also see the caves beneath the high rocks, even though due to safety reasons and falling stones, you were not allowed to walk inside those caves. It was also funny to see the color of the water. Where the water in most places we visited near the sea was a blue tint, the water here was completely brown!

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Standing on the ocean floor

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One thought on “Standing on the Ocean Floor: Bay of Fundy

  1. beppe says:

    Lieve Luce ,wat maak je fascinerende dingen mee. Bedankt dat we zo mee genieten mogen.
    Wij hebben natuurlijk ook wat met water dat altijd weer verbazing wekt en verrassend is.
    Nooit hetzelfde, al sta je bij wijze van spreken dagen aan de rand en op dezelfde plek.
    Liefs van Gr’Pa en Beppe.

    Like

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